Monday, April 12, 2021
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    A CELEBRATION OF BLACK WOMEN

    A CELEBRATION OF BLACK WOMEN

    Real Women Atlanta Magazine wants to commemorate amazing historical Black women. We believe it’s important for us as black women to know who they are and know how important they are to us today. These incredible women are Trailblazers and Pioneers who have paved the way for all of us and now we can stand in their shadows. Because of their tireless efforts, we can walk through open doors that were once closed to us. Their courage and dedication, they have changed and affected nations. WE wish we could name them all, but they’re accomplishments will forever be remembered. Here are some of them but we celebrate them all.

    Shirley Chisholm 1924-2005

    In 1972 become the First Black woman candidate to run for President as a Democrat. Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed. Shirley Anita Chisholm (November 30, 1924–January 1, 2005) was the first African American woman elected to Congress. She represented New York’s 12th congressional district from 1969 to 1983. She served seven terms and championed anti-poverty programs and educational reform. She was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the National Women’s Political Caucus. In 1972, Chisholm became the first woman to seek the presidential nomination from one of the two major political parties. Although her bid was unsuccessful, her candidacy enabled her to raise issues of importance to African Americans and women and to forge the way for others. “The door is not open yet,” she said, “but it is ajar.”

    Septima Clark 1896 – 1987

    Clark was an educator and civil rights activist who established citizenship schools that helped many African Americans register to vote. Regarded as a pioneer in grassroots citizenship education, she was active with the NAACP in getting more black teachers hired in the South.

           

    Mary Church Terrell  1863 – 1954

    Co-Founder of the NAACP established in 1909. This women’s suffrage activist and journalist was the first president of the National Association of Colored Women and a charter member of the NAACP. She was also one of the first African-American women to be awarded a college degree.

    Claudette Colvin 1939 – Present

    Several months before Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her seat on a bus, Colvin was the first person arrested for resisting bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, at the age of 15. She also served as one of four plaintiffs in the case of Browder v. Gayle, which ruled that Montgomery’s segregated bus system was unconstitutional.

    Angela Davis 1944 – Present

    Davis is a revolutionary American educator. The former Black Panther has fought for race, class and gender equality over the years. Davis authored one of the of the most distinguished books in the field of women’s studies called Women, Race & Class. She’s also an advocate of prison reform.

    Ida B. Wells-Barnett 1862-1931

    Wells helped bring international attention to the horrors of lynching in the South with her investigative journalism. She was also elected as the Secretary of the Colored Press Association in 1889.

    Kathleen Cleaver 1945-present

    Kathleen Cleaver is one of the central figures in Black Panther history. She was the first communications secretary for the organization and is currently a law professor at Emory University. She also helped found the Human Rights Research Fund.

    Dr. Dorothy Height 1912-2010

    Dr. Height was regarded by President Barack Obama as “the godmother of the Civil Rights Movement.” She served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for over two decades and was instrumental in the integration of all YWCA centers in 1946.

    Kathleen Cleaver 1945-present

    Kathleen Cleaver is one of the central figures in Black Panther history. She was the first communications secretary for the organization and is currently a law professor at Emory University. She also helped found the Human Rights Research Fund.

    Dr. Dorothy Height 1912-2010
    Dr. Height was regarded by President Barack Obama as “the godmother of the Civil Rights Movement.” She served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for over two decades and was instrumental in the integration of all YWCA centers in 1946.

    Phillis Wheatley 1753-1784
    Wheatley was a former slave who was kidnapped from West Africa and brought to America. She was bought by a Boston family and became their personal servant. With the aid of the family, she learned to read and eventually became one of the first women to publish a book of poetry in 1773.

    Flo Kennedy 1916-2000

    Kennedy was a founding member of the National Organization of Women and one of the first black female lawyers to graduate from Columbia Law School. She helped found the Feminist Party in 1971, which later nominated Representative Shirley Chisholm for president.

    Fannie Lou Hamer 1917-1977
    Hamer was a civil rights activist and organizer of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Fannie Lou Hamer. She helped blacks register to vote and co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

    Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune 1875-1955
    Dr. Bethune was an educator and civil rights activist who believed education was the key to racial advancement. She served as the president of the National Association of Colored Women and founded the National Council of Negro Women. She was also the president and founder of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida.

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